Perhaps balancing the joys of escapism with the awareness of deception was the whole point of why we read novels, but I was never able to successfully manage this simultaneous suspension of the real and the fictive. Maybe you just needed to be an adult in order to perform this high-wire act of believing and not-believing at the same time.

Reif Larsen, The Selected Works of T. S. Spivet

The Perils of Growing Up Flat-Chested (2013)

Short film written and directed by Yulin Kuang

Katya Liu played by Irene Choi (Other Annie from Community)
Owen Fullerman played by James Wolpert (The Voice)

Just from watching this I dub Yulin Kuang a wonderful being. This is dead-on.

jtotheizzoe:

kateoplis:

"A bloody year marked by assassinations, 17,000 Americans dead in Vietnam, riots, and campus unrest — ‘Earthrise’ saved 1968."
Neil deGrasse Tyson on the Forty-Fifth Anniversary of Earthrise

This changed the way we view humanity and its potential. It changed how we view Earth, borders, conflicts, history, future, each other … it changed our very place in the universe.
I think this is the most important photo ever taken.
Do you agree?

Don’t forget the Pale Blue Dot.

“Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there—on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”
- Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

jtotheizzoe:

kateoplis:

"A bloody year marked by assassinations, 17,000 Americans dead in Vietnam, riots, and campus unrest — ‘Earthrise’ saved 1968."

Neil deGrasse Tyson on the Forty-Fifth Anniversary of Earthrise

This changed the way we view humanity and its potential. It changed how we view Earth, borders, conflicts, history, future, each other … it changed our very place in the universe.

I think this is the most important photo ever taken.

Do you agree?

Don’t forget the Pale Blue Dot.

“Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there—on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

- Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

Sometimes you meet someone, and it’s so clear that the two of you, on some level belong together. As lovers, or as friends, or as family, or as something entirely different. You just work, whether you understand one another or you’re in love or you’re partners in crime. You meet these people throughout your life, out of nowhere, under the strangest circumstances, and they help you feel alive. I don’t know if that makes me believe in coincidence, or fate, or sheer blind luck, but it definitely makes me believe in something.

 (via godlovessean)
"Ugak Bay sleeps beneath a winter sun. Many of these long inlets deeply cleave the coast: No site on land is more than 15 miles from the sea."
This was in the November 1993 National Geographic and I thought it was too nice to stay forever on my shelf in an old November 1993 National Geographic.

"Ugak Bay sleeps beneath a winter sun. Many of these long inlets deeply cleave the coast: No site on land is more than 15 miles from the sea."

This was in the November 1993 National Geographic and I thought it was too nice to stay forever on my shelf in an old November 1993 National Geographic.